R for Revolution

A guest column by Jon Airheart

“Remember, Remember (the 5th of November)” is the battle cry of a masked man known only as V in the film V for Vendetta. The date serves as a historic anniversary of an act of civil disobedience in which freedom conquered tyranny — for a moment, anyway.

The date has lost all significance some hundreds of years later. It has all but been removed from history texts, in fact. It quickly becomes apparent that tyranny is alive and well in a futuristic England that is not all that futuristic at all thanks to its totalitarian government.

V is an eccentric enigma, clothed in all black, hell-bent on revenge and, ultimately, revolution. It turns out to be neither quick nor easy. But with a detailed plan and an unmatched determination, anything is possible.

The film refers to the United States as the former United States. We are alluded to as a 3rd world country in shambles.

I tried to play a song by America on my iPod recently and it couldn’t read it. It would just go to the next song. For some strange reason it didn’t recognize America.

I can relate.

If Jack Abramoff, Duke Cunningham, or Tom Delay aren’t grabbing scandalous headlines, the president is by defending warrant-less wiretapping of American citizens or allowing foreign countries to manage our seaports. We pay some farmers not to grow crops, and arrest sick people for growing illegal ones. The Supreme Court thinks it’s okay to take your home and give it to a business to increase the tax base. In many cases people not only lose their homes to eminent domain abuse but they literally pay for it through corporate subsidies. The entire country used to be a free speech zone, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Now it’s a 15-square foot fenced in cage open from noon to four, Monday through Friday, that you need 2 forms of ID to get into. Then there’s the Patriot Act — unconstitutional legislation voted on by a Congress that didn’t even read it — and it was just renewed. And the economy? The Senate just voted to allow the national debt to swell to nearly $9 trillion. Every man, woman and child in America now owes $30,000 apiece. Is it a debt ceiling or a debt sunroof?

Back to my iPod story, it wound up getting worse. Where once was bountiful, beautiful music and easy to read digital data, there was now only weird sounds and frown faces. I tried to comprehend how and why it happened, to no avail. The initial experience put me in less than a good mood, needless to say. But the disparaging feeling did not last long at all. I remembered I had a warranty. One of two things will happen when I make the time to call Apple. It will either be fixed or I will get a new one.

America, the country, is not that different. We, too, have a warranty: The Constitution and its Bill of Rights. We just have to make the time to call our representatives and remember to vote. Two things can happen once again. Either our current members of Congress will shape up or they will be ridden out of town.

Two different characters mention in the film more than once that they do not believe in coincidence. The movie opened to audiences on March 17, the eve of the 3rd anniversary of the invasion of Iraq. The whole movie revolves around the past, present and future of a date in early November. This year, elections will be held across the nation on the 7th of November.

In the film, there is a shipping company called BFC that delivers items that help accelerate the tipping point of V’s revolution. In District 10 of Texas there is a political campaign called Badnarik for Congress that has the best chance this year to send a shock wave through the American political system, the likes of which haven’t been seen in decades.

Remember, remember – the 7th of November! This is the new battle cry of hope. Of change. Of freedom, not fear.

18 Comments
  1. “the president is by defending warrantless wiretapping of American citizens or allowing foreign countries to manage our seaports.”

    Just to nitpick: Allowing other countries to manage our ports is simply a product of globalization; to make a law that requires otherwise would be protectionist.

    Also: I saw Vanishing Point on HBO today, and its message is very libertarian, and the movie is very good (4 stars). I highly recommend it.

  2. I’m just hoping that Halliburton is bothering to install comfortable cots in the concentration camps.

    People seem to think that they can wait until it’s too late to vote their way out of things. And that’s exactly what is liable to happen should the powerful’s powers be threatened. We are dealing with desperate, evil people. They might do ANYTHING to retain that power if it is legitimately threatened. Personally, I don’t think that they have any threat to be concerned about.

    Besides, they have unlimited money and power to co-opt most any threat does (and won’t) arrive, neutralizing it into compliance and even complicity.

  3. Dennis Anthony Porto:

    “Just to nitpick: Allowing other countries to manage our ports is simply a product of globalization;”

    Dennis, are you saying that globalization requires the dissolution of our borders?

    “to make a law that requires otherwise would be protectionist.”

    I wonder if you’re mixing apples and oranges. After all, the marriage of corporations and the state was Mussolini’s definition of fascism. What more powerful fascism could there be than multinational –dare I say it– global?

    I met with the Minutemen late last year. They told me in no uncertain terms that conservatives hate Libertarians not because we split their vote, but because we are out to erase the nation.

    I have to admit, they’ve got a case when so many of our platform planks conflict with our constitution.

    They were shocked when I told them that the choice is simple: the UN or the US and that I am not embarrassed to choose the US.

    The free market cannot exist under the UN.

    -0-

  4. V is for very soon…

    V is for the vindication of libertarians valiant efforts that have been voraciously fought by the vapid and vacuous Republicrats at every varying turn.

    But with a detailed plan and an unmatched determination, anything is possible.

    Guy Fawkes masks + Peaceful marches + Well organized libertarians = Stomping out this blackout by MSM and kickstarting our own revolution

    The NEW Sons of Liberty?
    http://www.ushistory.org/Declaration/related/sons.htm

  5. Anyone know where to get some “V for Vendetta” masks? These would be great to wear at tax day protests or similar events…

  6. V is for Vermont.

    Help us strike the heart of the progressive movement in America. Vermont has schismed more than other states. We have very far left and very far right parties, with no parties representing the middle. The V for Vermont Libertarian Party is trying to change it this year. We already have $10k in the bank waiting to help some of candidates this fall, but we currently need about $1000 for an outreach campaign to current local officials to find the libertarians in the haystacks around Vermont.

    You can donate with paypal at http://www.vtlp.org/

    Hardy

  7. Remember, remember – the 7th of November! This is the new battle cry of hope. Of change. Of freedom, not fear.

    submitting a request to pick new rulers, following the procedure of the borg, is a “battle cry of hope”? not on this planet. would ron paul be ron paul if there were many ron pauls “in office” wielding power? that’s not an assumption any observer of history or human behavior should make. freedom lies not at “the polls”. voting is an act of aggression and submission at once.

    politics flow from the people up — probably more than “top” down (works both ways). ignore or deny this, and you’re just drilling your head into the ground. voting will not change the spirit of sheep hordes. the heavy, slow payoff work is in converting people away from the state, not harder toward it. that’s one small positive aspect of the otherwise vacant FSP; it seeks to change the local ratio of sheep to humans.

  8. I find it inherently counterproductive to refer to individuals whom have never had the opportunity to share our enlightenment as “sheeple” or anything synonymous when it is precisely *them* that we are attempting to sway to our opinion.

    Even if that is how you feel, keep it in thought-form only. Anything stated here will inevitably be used against the party as a whole by some entrepeneurial spirit in agreement with the oppositional parties.

  9. “I wonder if you’re mixing apples and oranges. After all, the marriage of corporations and the state was Mussolini’s definition of fascism. What more powerful fascism could there be than multinational –dare I say it– global?”

    I don’t think that ports should be considered the state. As a libertarian, I think that every market that can be private should be private, and our ports should be among those. To claim that any market should be exclusive to one’s own nation is protectionist.

  10. To Dennis Anthony Porto,

    The issue is not priviatization, it’s who gets the contract. I, for certain, and probably Jon as well, have no objection to the privatization of ports and even border guards, as long as that’s American companies and American citizens:people whose commitment is local; people whom, if they fail to protect us as promised or worse, betray us, can be charged with crimes all the way up to treason.

    -0-

  11. I have about as much interest in Libertarians appealing to conservative Minutemen as I do in agreeing with Roy Moores.

  12. Graham said, “I have about as much interest in Libertarians appealing to conservative Minutemen as I do in agreeing with Roy Moores.”

    Then it’s a good thing nobody around here is talking about doing either.

    -0-

  13. Allen Hacker,

    If we agree that ports should be privitized, and you are a libertarian, than we can also agree that in the free market, the most responsible, accountible, and trustworty people will get control over the ports. I am not arguing that Dubai is this company, instead I am arguing against port protectionism: the idea that Americans should be the only ones allowed to manage US ports.

    Also, securtiy is a different matter. The ports deal concerned only management, not security. I agree that the US should have a monopoly on US securty (they call these people police).