Old-Skool Libertarian Agitprop

From the description of Make Mine Freedom:

“This Cold War-era cartoon uses humor to tout the dangers of Communism and the benefits of capitalism.” 1948. Cartoon in Public Domain and available to download at Internet Archive.

It’s awesome how the character who stands up and asks questions is like the quintessential libertarian blogger of today — questioning the results of the “ISM” and warning about trading freedom for security. His monologue could probably be modified very easily to fit in today’s climate of creeping fascism. If only cartoons with political messages like this still played on television.

  1. Updating is *all* it would need.

    And it would be important to make that updating simply *ADDITIONAL* material rather than replacement.

    ‘specially considering how the increase of redistribution has caused a *DECREASE* in proportional representation of educational standards.

    People don’t realize just how *HUGELY* significant it is to have a highly-skilled, highly-educated skilled laborpool.

    Our economy is, today, based mainly on service. Which is… the dog chasing its own tail.

    Gah — I’m preaching to the choir here. I’ll *spread* this vid!

  2. The problem is that if you updated it, all the positive economic information would no longer be positive. That’s what is so telling about the cartoon – none of it applies anymore and the “ISM” has been accepted.

    The cartoon requires no updating, but maybe a floater with the date it was created and then a second episode of where we are now.

  3. Awesome video. I am with DD I wouldn’t change it all except put a date on it. Then I would follow with one that is more current and show all that we have lost or given up since the earlier version.

  4. DD, TerryP — that’s pretty much what I was getting at — comparative differences in tandem with increases in tax rate & social program spending, as bar-graphs.

    I think they’d be pretty damned telling, right there.

  5. DD — because total spending includes the military-industrial complex, which throws off the curve as it were.

    The point that I was trying to drive home with the thought is: The more money you spend to make sure everybody has food & shelter, the more people *NEED* you to spend on them — when you’re using their money to do it.

    After all; if the overall taxation rate were dropped to a flat 10% — this is just an example — on both businesses and individuals, the overall buying power of any given individual would increase roughly 50%, in terms of liquidity increase & cost reductions.

    That would roughly alter the currently poverty level from 32k annual to 20k annual. If you can’t get above the limit at that rate… you don’t *deserve* to.

  6. Note that we’ve already lost most of what he’s talking about.

    It is literally illegal for you to start your own car company in your garage, today. The regulations you’re required to pass before being allowed to sell your first car cost tens of millions alone, probably more for someone who hasn’t already accomplished most of it on previous models.

    We’re lucky we didn’t have the current government back when the Industrial Revolution took off, to say “hey, people are investing in speculation on the futures of new technologies, instead of on nice, safe financial metrics, so we’ll raise interest rates until we drive investment out of the new industries and cause economic failure”, the way the Fed did in 1999, and from which we’re still recovering.

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