“Liberty” costume draws “lunatic fringe” label

Brophy as Lady LibertyApparently Mark Brophy, Libertarian Party candidate running for Congress State Representative in Colorado’s District-53 thought that gender-bending and dressing up as lady liberty would score him some media coverage. But the stunt only served to piss off other third party candidates and the disdain of folks who showed up to watch a civilized debate:

The scene last week in the Colorado State University student government senate meeting room was typical of most political forums, with one notable exception””in addition to the suited candidates ready to summarize their campaigns, and the gathered voters eager to hear about them, was a man dressed head to toe as the Statue of Liberty, complete with a foam crown and toy torch.

Presumably, some in the crowd were tempted to brand him as one of the lunatic fringe that seem to be attracted to any political gathering, but Mark Brophy isn’t so easily dismissed.

[…] It’s clearly a matter of opinion as to whether dressing in costume helps or hurts the effort, but it certainly doesn’t do any favors for other minor-party candidates who are serious about getting elected.

“Some of the well-meaning comedy, like candidates appearing in costume, doesn’t help someone like me who’s trying to present a serious alternative,” says Eric Eidsness, a Reform Party candidate for Colorado’s 4th Congressional District.

Someone explain exactly what the message was supposed to be, because it reeks of corny opportunism.

Fortunately for Brophy, there was Gene Freeman, chairman of the Larimer County Libertarian Party, able to salvage some credibility by moving back into talking points about winning elections by presenting viable candidates:

“The point is to increase numbers and awareness. Eventually we’ll win, or at least get our issues into a major political arena,” he says.

According to the Larimer County chapter, the Libertarian Party is the only growing political party in Colorado, while major party numbers are decreasing on both sides of the fence.

“We’ve doubled our numbers in the last few years, and we want to do it again in the next five” says Brophy.

But others, like Freeman, are clearly focused on winning elections.

“We are running to win,” Freeman says. “We’re not really doing the education thing so much anymore.”

This is a prime example of why any political/publicity stunts should avoid putting the candidate in costume or performing the stunt personally (or wearing hats that make your head look freakishly large). It screams of desperation, and voters can smell desperate ploys a mile away. This is not to say that publicity stunts are bad, but next time I’d suggest he get some supporters or volunteers to dress up in Liberty drag.

68 Comments
  1. I have to agree in part and disagree in part. If members of the Libertarian Party want the party to be taken seriously they have to act in a professional manner. I was doing outreach a few months back not long after the national convention. A gentleman who not only was familiar with the national party, he was sympathetic to our platform. His concern was taking the party seriously when one of our National delegates (Starchild) dressed up as Lady Liberty. I had to make excuses when I should have been closing the deal on this potential recruit. I basically told the interested party that we are a party of individuals and we don’t control or dictate the actions of those individuals. He understood but it is still a sore point with me.

    If you want to promote the cause of Liberty, you’ll do a far better job dressing in a suit and tie and acting in a professional manner by gaining the respect of people than by some stupid gimmicky outfit.

  2. Ugh. That might be appropriate when doing outreach at a fair or something, but it’s not a good idea for a debate. A nice suit would have been much better.

  3. Friends don’t let friends dress up as the Statue of Liberty for a debate. Wearing sneakers too, even worse.

    Tired of this kind of candidate? Move to NH as part of the Free State Project…. we’re teaching people how to run credible campaigns and be involved in politics making a real difference, and come Nov 7th, the results will be clear.

  4. Suit and tie? Let’s see, who else is big on suits and ties?

    Major party politicians.
    Lobbyists.
    Televangelists.
    Used car salesmen.
    Corporate PR flacks.
    Ambulance chasing lawyers.
    TV talking heads.

    I’m sure I could think of some more examples. I think that, overall (not in every case of course) most of the honest people in America don’t wear suits too often, and most of the parasites wear them more days than not.

  5. It’s not all “lunatic fringe” in Fort Collins:
    – the campus libertarians at Colorado State University – http://www.lpcsu.org/ – have been going gangbusters supporting statewide ballot initiatives, including marijuana legaliation and domestic partnerships.
    – Jesse Herron, local businessman and Libertarian candidate for county assessor here, has proposed innovative new ideas good enough for the Democratic candidate to steal and campaign on.
    – Dawn Winkler, our gubernatorial candidate, is garnering unprecedented endorsements as the *only* pro-choice candidate in the race.
    – The Larimer County LP has surpassed the Green Party in registration numbers for the first time ever; while they’re declining and falling apart, we’re growing.

    Some of us in Colorado and Fort Collins know how to do things well.

    (FYI, Brophy is not running for U.S. Congress, but for Colorado state house. If you’re going to disparage fellow Libertarians, please at least get your facts right.)

  6. The mistake that a lot of libertarians make:

    yes, it’s true that more people will take a candidate seriously if they look like a professional politician is supposed to look.

    However, most people will not vote for an alternative candidate.

    Who is most likely to vote for an outsider? Someone who is an outsider themselves.

    Actually, if LP candidates are so intent on appearing professional – how about the world’s oldest profession?

    That particular image would be a more truthful presentation of what politics is all about.

    There are times when you have to get down in the sewer (as that is what politics is) but why not at least be honest about it, rather than pretend it is something high and noble?

    Leave that to the people who really thing politicians making our decisions is a good thing.

  7. So what? The guy doesn’t look as good as Starchild does in drag. Big deal. Oh, wait…some people are upset that he wore it? Big deal. At least it isn’t a chicken suit….

  8. I was wondering what to wear for Halloween. Now I think I’ll decorate my costume with lunatic fringe.

    Seriously, if you advocate government that does not initiate force as a means of achieving political or social goals even against minorities, misfits, odd-balls and the strange and wonderful, then who are you going to attract? If you don’t believe in letting the majority force their will on the losers in a race, aren’t you going to attract losers?

    Face it, we are the only party that stands up for the rights of losers, misfits and techno-dweebs, alike.

    I wouldn’t advocate looking scary to prospective voters, but neither would I shy away from defending any individual expressing their ideas in their own way. Our allies don’t fit anywhere else.

  9. Exactly!

    Perhaps those who want to look and sound like the establishment secretly hope to act like them once in office.

    Not that they’ll be in office.

  10. Those of you defending this publicity stunt are so off-base, it’s amazing. You don’t defend weirdoes and freaks by dressing up as a weirdo or freak. You don’t run for office in a hawaiian shirt.

    Whether we like it or not, the public at large has a certain expectation of what it wants their politicians to look like. I don’t like it either, but that’s the reality.

    If you want to be seen as competitive for the position, you have to put on the costume of the position. Public consensus, of which I am not a part, has determined that the costume for a politician is a suit. When you dress up as Lady Liberty while running for the office THE WORDS ARE LOST on the voters due to the DISTRACTION OF THE COSTUME.

    Our candidates really need to, if men wear suits and ties, or if women wear professional suits. To do anything less is to sabotage the party.

    I don’t have any problem with wearing Lady Liberty or going out in your birthday suit once we have achieved majority status.

  11. I had people in Georgia mad because we had a candidate wear an earring,even though he was in a nice suit.I believe our candidates should wear suits but so should the main people helping. Which I do not do a good job at myself.

  12. Yes to what ZanderC said in #13. You have to dress for the position you want, not the position you’re in. That’s true in the political world as well as the career world.

  13. To check out what candidate Captain Liberty himself says about the debate and press coverage, check out his blog at blog.myspace.com/choicecitylib.

  14. The problem was the event. It was clearly an event where it would have been appropriate to wear a suit and tie.

    Stunts are great for campaigns. But they should be kept to street protests and demonstrations.

    Also, he’s a Dude. Dressing up like a woman made him look kooky.

    If he had been a Sam Adams or Ben Franklin, it wouldn’t have been half as bad.

  15. With Cato and Gallup telling us that somewhere on the order of 9-23% of Americans holding “libertarian” opinions, we now have a good idea of at least part of what’s keeping us from achieving even a modicum of electoral success. Enough people already think we’re a cult. Now, they’ll think we’re all retarded. Smooth one, Mr. Brophy.

    We have met the enemy, and he is us.

  16. “I think that, overall (not in every case of course) most of the honest people in America don’t wear suits too often, and most of the parasites wear them more days than not. ”

    Paulie,
    I agree, but most of the “sheeple” or people who make up mosst of the voters probably respect those in suits more and take them moe seriously. Especially self-hating people who need someone in power to lookup to. They want the illusion of voting for someone more important than they are.


  17. I agree, but most of the “sheeple” or people who make up most of the voters probably respect those in suits more and take them moe seriously. Especially self-hating people who need someone in power to lookup to. They want the illusion of voting for someone more important than they are.

    And I agree with you, but guess what? They’re not quite THAT dumb. Putting on a suit ain’t enough to get them to vote for you. My whole point was not to appeal to most of the voters, because you’ll be wasting your time – they will not vote for you anyway.

    On the other hand, there are lots of folks who naturally sympathize with our views but they don’t vote, or may never have heard of us. When they see someone who does not dress like a politician, they might actually pay attention long enough to hear that we want to get politicians to stop controlling their lives, and they don’t like being controlled.

    They will never pay attention long enough to hear this message otherwise.

  18. If you want to be seen as competitive for the position, you have to put on the costume of the position. Public consensus, of which I am not a part, has determined that the costume for a politician is a suit.

    True. There are people for whom a politician is a good thing, and a suit makes you more of a proper politician. These are not our audience. They like being controlled, perhaps aspire to control others, and are happy with the status quo.

    For others, suits and politicians tend to be bad, evil things. They could be libertarians, but they don’t pay much attention to politics, and sensibly conclude that all politicians are the same.

    “Let’s see, who else is big on suits and ties?”

    Candidates who have actually gotten elected.

    Item #1 on my list. Did you read the rest?

  19. “We have met the enemy, and he is us.”

    Hate to say it, but hasn’t that always been the case. It’s so easy to blame the major parties and the media for our failure, but it’s so difficult to hold up a mirror and look at what’s wrong with ourselves. We kill ourselves by targeting the “lunatic fringe” instead of making Libertarianism a mainstream philosophy.

    Paulie’s “estblishment” comments are irrelevant, as in the lifespan of the LP, the establishment has only grown stronger, proving it’s politically unprincipled to corner ourselves. Only when we can impact the establishment in real political terms and change the mindset of the average person can we change the establishment. This is all the Libertarian Reform Caucus has been trying to get the party to do, and I think we’ve mostly succeeded.

    While I can’t say much about the canidate’s intentions, I do think that this was a very misguided stunt and we should all learn from it. Candidates are the public face of the party.

  20. Hate it or love it, Mark Brophy’s stunt got him included in the debate he had been shut out of and extra attention when he wouldn’t have gotten any–that’s the lead that got buried with SVD’s post focus on the costume.

    Don’t forget to read the whole article–it’s pretty good.

    On a somewhat related issue, do you think my statewide ballot nickname will be treated as a cutesy or stupid gimmick, or might trigger many voters to really think about just what it is they’re really voting for? Depending on the printed ballot or Direct Recording Equipment used, my nickname becomes more prominent than party affiliation or the Libertarian party affiliation even gets stripped from my name at vote confirmation. I set the statewide non-major party, non-presidential vote total record two years without the nickname and thought I’d try the nickname this time in a repeat run. (I admit my website is still a work in progress given my difficulty in writing)

  21. Lunatic fringe? Half the people don’t vote, dude.

    Go to the top of the page. Loretta is getting national news coverage by honestly discussing smoking dope, not wearing panties, and boobs.

    Meanwhile, dull LP candidates try to mimick the tweedle dum/tweedle dees. But why should those who want more of the same vote for something different?

    You see, not everyone is the same. There are lots of people who don’t wear suits much, and don’t like people who do. They don’t vote, because all politicians are just more of the same. And the only way we will ever get their attention long enough to notice we are different (and more like them) is by not looking and sounding like more of the same.

    (OK, some of them do vote, but don’t pay attention to politics much).

    But don’t listen to me; look at what’s happening with Loretta’s campaign.

  22. Only when we can impact the establishment in real political terms and change the mindset of the average person can we change the establishment.

    Sorry, but you won’t change the establishment by mimicking it.

    Unfortunately, while you want to be pragmatic, you don’t know how.

  23. If a Democrat wore a donkey costume, voters might conclude that he is a stubborn ass. If a Republican dressed up as an elephant, voters might conclude that he advocates enormous government. If a Reform Party candidate dressed up as Jesse Ventura, voters might conclude that he is big and loud. If a Green Party candidate dressed up as a tree, voters might conclude that he believes trees are more important than people.

    When a Libertarian dresses up as Lady Liberty, voters might conclude that he advocates liberty. And, they might remember that the Statue of Liberty was given by France because Alexis de Toqueville and other foreigners perceive America as a daring political experiment in individual liberty.

    Should the Libertarian Party choose a different symbol? Do foreigners still perceive the United States as the sweet land of liberty? Is liberty still something to sing about?

  24. Tim,

    I thought you wanted a “big tent” Libertarian Party. Jefferson is clearly within the libertarian quadrant of the Nolan chart (from Brian Holtz). Jefferson wasn’t perfect, but nobody is.

    Or, at the risk of starting another discussion, what is your definition of libertarian? It’s been a while since Liberty For Sale so I’ve forgotten (are archives online somewhere?).

    I hope you’re doing okay these days. Take care. Say hi to Gloria for me.

  25. Paulie,

    Show me proof that 30 years of the LP shunning the political approach practiced by the establishment (i.e. appealing to moderates, at least when they’re not in power) and criticizing candidates and members that reach out to moderates has made the establishment any less powerful and centralized and any more libertarian. Until you can do this, you have no real pulpit from which to speak.

    If the political process means nothing to you, why even waste your time in a political party? By pushing a political party away from acting like a political party, you’re compromising the potential for the success of others who want to accomplish your ends, albeit via different means.

    The Reform Party became relevant by appealing to moderates (although splintered over lack of unifying ideology). Socialism became relevant when attached to moderate populism. The argument that a third party or ideology is irrelevant unless it caters to fringe is utterly false in the context of history.

  26. Nick,

    You must be laboring under the false impression that the LP has been doing what I want it to. If you pay more attention you’ll notice that I have made numerous criticisms of the LP’s modus operandi.

    The Reform Party screwed itself by standing for nothing. I agree that the Socialists had an impact, and I believe that if run intelligently, the Libertarians could as well. I don’t really expect that to happen anymore, but I haven’t ruled out the possibility.

  27. Should the Libertarian Party choose a different symbol? Do foreigners still perceive the United States as the sweet land of liberty? Is liberty still something to sing about?

    In the days of King George IV Dubai-ya’s Fourth Reich/World War IV/Reign of Terror against the world, they perceive it as the exact opposite. Not everyone takes it to the extent of hating innocent Americans, but enough do that many Americans abroad have to resort to pretending to be Canadians.

    That was not the case before the Bush Crime Family stole their first national election, bombed the twin towers, and started invading multiple foreign countries simultaneously while making Big Lie speeches about “axis” and “fascism” (not, of course, their own).

    Before they instituted torture, secret prisons, wiretapping, indefinite detention without charges, and executive dictatorship as the new American norm.

    It’s no longer the USA, it’s the USSA now.

  28. Daniel,

    I’m simply stating a fact. Jefferson was not a libertarian. He believed in a national draft, among other things. I’m not commenting on your name otherwise, but stating that Jefferson was a libertarian is a factual incorrectness. He was nothing of the sort. He believed in self government, whereas the core belief of the LP is a belief in no government.

    I have left the LP and renounced the oath. My health is not permitting me to get much done these days.

  29. oh, and Gloria is fine, thank god. if it were not for her I would have wished I was dead.

  30. “Welcome to Bubba�s Auto Parts and Day Spa, the one-stop source for your car, truck, and personal beautification needs. We got yer rubbing compounds and exfoliating facial scrubs, motor oils and scented oils, paste wax and bikini wax. Relax in our steam room while we steam clean your engine. Soak in beauty mud while we install new mud flaps on your four-wheeler. And check out our specials on aisle seven: buy one Fram oil filter and get a free loofah sponge.”

    Political Party or Protest Organization

  31. I’m reading the comments here, and I’m really not impressed. Since when was “not dressing up in Lady Liberty drag” merely an act of “mimicking the establishment”? We’re so concerned with getting attention and being different that we’re totally lost as to how to behave once we’ve got it, and how to discerne between constructive and destructive forms of attention.

    People expect a certain level of decorum from politicians. Granted, this is an inconsistently applied rule, but you ignore it at your perile. All press, unfortunately, is not good press, and people aren’t going to listen to you if you make a point of not taking it seriously when you get your chance to talk to them.

    Let’s shun the establishment with our arguments, not with our outfits, shall we?

  32. Carl a bit of criticism if you don’t mind. In your post #37 I think it would have been better to use as an example a fast food deli and a crematorium.
    You know “Smoked Meats Done Right”.
    Thanks. Just ask for help any time.
    M.H.W. 99.9% pure

  33. “the days of King George IV Dubai-ya’s Fourth Reich/World War IV/Reign of Terror against the world”

    Thank god the Libertarian Party is here to save the day and unite the sci-fi reading, pot-smoking, conspiracy theorist computer programmers of the world. It’s great to have a real and viable political alternative to both fascism and socialism.

    Paulie – if I’m not getting your point, what specifically DO you want the Libertarian Party to do and be? The party orthodoxy’s policy of evangelization, ideological rigidity and disdain for anything that looks politically motivated has not increased liberty. Maybe you agree.

    The LRC is proposing real and historically successful solutions to correct this failure. How do you propose solving the problem? Seriously. Because I just don’t want to think about most of the LP candidates flaunting their breasts and the fact that they aren’t wearing any underwear. Smither and Badnarik don’t have the…”charisma” to pull these tactics off.

  34. I just finished reading the Fort Collins Weekly article. It is actually very positive in its coverage of third parties in general and the Libertarian Party specifically. Stephen’s write-up paints a different picture than the one I saw reading the actual article.

    Mark Brophy received a relatively positive write-up in the paper. If he didn’t dress up in a stupid costume he would have received NO write-up, and ZERO attention.

    Without Loretta Nall’s “charisma”, she would be standing on street corners preaching to the birds. Instead, she’s getting interviews on Fox News and Keith Olbermann. Without the clusterfuck in TX CD22, Bob Smither would be a paper candidate who would have received about 1-2% of the vote. Instead, he will probably get more than 20% and he has a decent shot of winning. Without a lot of money, Badnarik would be getting little to no media coverage. Instead, he’s receiving … well … the other two are better examples.

  35. People expect a certain level of decorum from politicians.

    Some people. Not everyone is the same.

    See above.

    Nick:

    Have you read through my blog posts? Click on my name.

    The answer to that question can be pretty complex, but the main parts include appealing to the left more, a much bigger emphasis on marketing and outreach (niche marketing specifically), a more activist-oriented party culture, more diversity, embracing a combination of Green goals and Libertarian means, guerilla marketing, youth-focus, and making things less dull.

    There’s a lot more to it than that and I’ve described many parts of it in various comments in numerous threads. I’m a little surprised you haven’t caught any of those.

    And despite your intentions, or Carl’s or Tim’s, so far the Reform Caucus has mainly opened the door mostly to more Boortzification of the LP, which is the last thing we need.

    If I was as opposed to coalitions as you say, why do I like Zeese and Murphy?

  36. I strongly agree with most of your points, except for the ones that the Libertarian Party has been doing that have repeatedly failed: namely, 1.) guerilla marketing (see: “Libertarian Macho Flash”) and 2.) confining our approach to niche marketing (see: the LP’s poll results in almost every election ever, which reflect that radical anarchists who support banning all taxes, private nuclear arms ownership and strict adherence to the non-initiation of force ideology aren’t a very big niche. Besides, a big tent approach makes us more flexible to be able to cater to niches, instead of a policy of ideological rigidity that only relies on successful evangelism to “convert” new niches to anarchocapitalism.)

    I’d say Tim, Carl and me are mostly in agreement with your ideas other than that.

  37. So rigid ideologues are to be replaced by tepid conformists ?

    Liberty is the idea that people will seek their own lot in life without interference from others. Perhaps a Patrick Henry costume would have been more effective or legit in this instance. Starchild pulled off the Lady Liberty thing at the convention, shrug.

    Who cares ? Let every candidate do their thing. Those with better results will be emulated by others seeking similiar success. A natural selection will occur. That’s the lesson of the political marketplace.

    Unfortunately we are strapped with electoral factors not readily fixed with holistic interventions or renunciation of pledges or platforms. Winner takes all is brutal and overwhelming. It guarantees that most of the best and brightest will jump on those gravy trains or be punished for doing otherwise.

    Ours is a noble lot forged from radicalism and sustained by activism. Practice your own brand of vodoo and shake your fists at the indifferent political universe.

  38. “so far the Reform Caucus has mainly opened the door mostly to more Boortzification of the LP”

    How? Because some of us in the LRC like the FairTax? You should too – it’s the only way Greens will ever give up their ridiculous adherence to the income tax and join us, as it out-progressives even them. I haven’t seen a sudden swell of Liberventionist warmongerers – and Dondero doesn’t count. The “Neo-Libertarians” were well in place before the LRC started – their voices are not new. Some of them have latched on to us because of our success, but I think the solid majority of the LRC has, if anything, quelled their influence. I can even give you some evidence:

  39. Eric: you make the case for the LP being a protest organization. If so, great! An ultra-radical in-your-face LP would do a better job of getting the message out than what we have today.

    Such an LP won’t win many elections, but who cares. If we get the message out enough, perhaps the old parties will pick up parts of it.

    But if we are to maintain the pretense of being a real political party, then some seriousness is in order.

    Make the choice.

    It’s the schizophrenia that hurts.

  40. “Besides, a big tent approach makes us more flexible to be able to cater to niches…”

    Which is why I’m confused at the outcry concerning some dressing as the Statue of Liberty, or Loretta Nall “milking her assets” (punny) for all the media attention she can get. I think Stan Jones is a fruitcake, but in Montana his ideas and the way he presents them may work better than a Bob Smither or Harry Browne approach.

    Unfortunately, some candidates have to wave their hands in the air to receive any attention. In some regions and races, that isn’t necessary.

    “guerilla marketing (see: “Libertarian Macho Flash”)”

    Guerilla Marketing and Macho Flashing are not the same thing.

    “confining our approach to niche marketing …”

    Jim Gilchrist was very successful focusing on his niche market. Even Bob Smither is targeting his campaign towards a niche.

  41. “Eric: you make the case for the LP being a protest organization.”

    No, Eric did not. You are putting words in people’s mouths to suit your own agenda.

  42. Here’s the link to the Caucus’s most popular complete platform proposal, written by me (but a compilation of sorts of the most popular planks on the site.)http://www.reformthelp.org/platformRewrite/rights/p3.php

    Scroll down to the “Military Policy” section and the “Presidential War Powers” section. While I call for having a Constitutionally-oriented military that is prepared to respond in the event of an attack and preventing mass genocides where there is no other viable force to stop it, it’s difficult to claim the LRC is supporting Boortzian foreign policy ideas – it criticizes war, American military imperialism, overextension, and unilateral executive branch warfare.

    It strikes a balance between the anti-war/empire libertarians/Left and moderates/less hawkish conservatives who want to maintain domestic security, an effective military and international stability. This is the way big tent politics works.

  43. My whole point was not to appeal to most of the voters, because you’ll be wasting your time – they will not vote for you anyway.

    Paulie, if you believe that is true, then why would you waste one second of your time on a policital party that promotes libertarianism?

    If we only want to influence people, we could form an educational foundation or a PAC. We could avoid all the regulation headaches that come with setting up a party, ballot access hassles, the recruiting and training candidates, etc.

  44. By the way, I’ve never thought it appropriate for the Libertarian Party to tell it’s candidates how to dress or behave. We libertarians believe in markets and competition. What the LP could use are more disputed primaries where more than one Libertarian is running for the same office. The best way to do that would be to open up the party as a big tent, welcome to anybody in the libertarian quadrant.

  45. From the bottom,

    Mike:

    No, most people will not vote for the LP, but it can serve a purpose by galvanizing groups of people left out by the major parties and getting our voice heard. Educational foundations are great, but there are people better reached by political parties, and having a political party puts pressure on major parties to consider our ideas by tipping the balance in elections.

    Chris is right:

    Guerilla Marketing and Macho Flashing are not the same thing.

    Regarding the FraudTax I think I’ve made my views about that abundantly clear, but if anyone here is new and wants to see it again, just let me know.

    Yes, the liberwarmongers, closed borderists and fraud taxers were around before this year, but there seem to be more this year as a result of the “reforms”. Reforms don’t always have their intended result.

    As for the LP election results, they are not proof that principles should be watered down. They’re proof of institutional barriers against…..

  46. …third parties in the winner take all political system;

    lack of marketing;

    and the negative effect of the continued right tilt in the way libertarianism is presented.

  47. Dr. Milstead,

    Prior to my involvement, the upstate NY chapters of the LP may have fit your your stereotype of the inept Rothbardian/Randian faction you villify at every opportunity. Before my candidacy was derailed by the same group that brought you the Bush/Gore fiasco in Florida in 2000, we integrated technology, got media attention and positive public response. In June we managed 2.5% in a Zogby poll with four other Democrats still in the race. This was in a district were a Libertarian had never run.

    Mr. Stuart of this site lauded our only commercial and we also leveraged public access channels with previous appearances on Gary Popkin’s Hardfire program out of Brooklyn. We organized two debates and took part in another in a race considered one of the top five nastiest in the country. To date the major heavies have not debated.

    I serve on the state and national committees. I am also organize local efforts in all 10 counties this race included . . .

  48. . . . the data that our campaign has collected is going to be integrated into the BallotBase effort. To date I have yet to see more video footage from the national convention then my own effort. I might even notice that my website met the cut for the W3 standard given in the posts after this one. The GOP candidate for Congress in the ajoining district actually represented me at the BOE hearing.

    If I am not engaging in politics than perhaps I have multiple personality problems rather then the schizophrenia you are suggesting. Perhaps I should take up the offers the main party people are offering me. I try to stay light and pithy on this site in order to encourage or promote positive LP activity.

    I stood around while you were holding court prior to the commencement ceremonies in Portland. As your crew opined about your victory and talked about retaining the anarchists, I didn’t hear any strategy, tactics or political development beyond the simple idea of pummelling the platform.

  49. “How? Because some of us in the LRC like the FairTax? You should too – it’s the only way Greens will ever give up their ridiculous adherence to the income tax and join us, as it out-progressives even them”

    The “Fair Tax” is a fraud and it does nothing to reduce government. Instead of this “Fair Tax” foolishness how about putting spending limits on the Federal government?

  50. “Guerilla Marketing and Macho Flashing are not the same thing.”

    You’re right, but they have a great deal of similarity and overlap, especially in effects. The idea behind Macho Flashing is similar to Britain’s Official Monster Raving Loony Party – that if you suprise people with stuff that sounds insane and shocking, eventually it will become accepted and no one will be shocked anymore. The idea behind Guerilla Marketing is showing up and suprising random audiences – tied with radical ideas, the goal is to achieve the same end.

    One must only look at the farthest (anarchist) Left to see why radical guerilla marketing makes them into jokes to the average person instead of an effective political force. “Guerilla marketing” in and of itself is not a problem, per se – it’s the message that goes along with it that is.

  51. The best way to do that would be to open up the party as a big tent, welcome to anybody in the libertarian quadrant.

    Yes, the liberwarmongers, closed borderists and fraud taxers were around before this year, but there seem to be more this year as a result of the “reforms”. Reforms don’t always have their intended result.

    amazing.

  52. Julia/Julian,

    Yes, it’s true, my utopia (I don’t have or want one, but nevermind) would be void of everything but you.

    Not.

  53. Tim – I can’t believe you’re gonna cut and run after reforming the LP.

    I think Paulie has it about right. The vast majority of LP candidates have ALWAYS worn suits and ties – they are not holding office.

    The approach of appealing to centrists and moderates only works for the GOP and the Dems because they have a large base. The 1% or 2% edge they can get from “the center” can win an election. If the LP got ALL of the swing voters in the center, the LP still loses. Therefore this approach is a losing strategy, despite making conformists feel comfortable. This strategy has actually alienated what small base the LP has, …er had.

    If the LP ever wins an election, it will be because it motivated those to go vote who haven’t been voting and simply acting like a Republicrat isn’t going to motivate these people.

    God knows, the LP approach of recent years – pandering to disgruntled Republicans – hasn’t worked.

    Oh yeah, Neal Boortz wears a suit – case closed.

  54. Dr. Carl writes:

    It’s the schizophrenia that hurts.

    Dr. Carl – they have meds for that. But perhaps it is not schizophrenia you suffer from – it could be cognitive dissonance. This condition might result from simultaneously being a raging moderate extremist and a “libertarian”.

    Anxiety often occurs when one has internalized two entirely different belief systems. No amount of conformity will alleviate the symptoms. However, a nice silk power tie might help you to feel better about yourself.

  55. Tom,

    my wife didnt mail the letter to HQ for 4 days. It laid in the truck. I took it back and gave myself a week.

    I think I’ll stay. I had a lot of bad shit going on health wise. It affected my judgement.

  56. But laying the groundwork for another org is probably still a good idea. It wont make any claims on the word libertarian.

  57. Whereas I don’t agree that we should jump on the conformist bandwagon. A little “in your face” is good. Better in my opinion would have been to organize 10-50 people in liberty costumes to walk around and ‘CALMLY’ hand out flyers for both local and national lp information as well as candidate information.

    Yelling and screaming detracts people and they will shun your message.

    Lunatic fringe!? Thank you… I would hate to boring and normal. BTW, libertarians really should not be calling anyone in their party a part of the “lunatic fringe”, we are a group of individuals. The term “lunatice fringe” is subjective and could easily be passed back and forth for different reasons.

    Hi, I am “Mr. Lunatic Fringe” and,
    I approved this message…. oh did I say terrorist or terrorism yet!?

%d bloggers like this: