Gillespie Talks Mierda

I guess it’s Reason night tonight — I haven’t hit their site much lately and am trying to catch up (I also catch up on the magazine on plane flights then donate them to my physician wife’s waiting room). For a more objective view at the racist immigration related banter floating about, one might wish to take a look at Nick Gillespie’s latest about Rep. Tom Tancredo’s proposal to force everyone to speak English. Here’s a clip:

Thank you, Middle Eastern 9/11 hijackers, for finally getting the point through our thick skulls (forgive our slowness, but all too many of us are descended from immigrants) that the greatest security threat to the United States is the influx of Spanish speakers from across the border with Mexico. […]

It’s embarrassing enough — humiliating really – that the United States doesn’t have a state religion, which would facilitate community and national identity. […]

…I think about my maternal grandfather, Nicola Guida, who showed up at Ellis Island (what a polyglot slum that was!) in 1913 and then proceeded to waste most of his time working manual labor jobs like quarrying rock and digging basements by hand and raising four children rather than taking the time to learn English, the ingrate. It’s one of the great pities of my life that, because I speak no Italian (other than what I picked via the Godfather movies) and he spoke no English (other than what he picked up watching Gunsmoke, his favorite TV show), I was never able to communicate effectively to him just how un-American he was.

If you haven’t figured it out already, you’ll have to hit his article to see why I accused him of talking mierda.

9 Comments
  1. I don’t follow your post here; are you saying the article is wrong, or that it is satirical? From my read, it is much more the latter.

    Oh- and the word in Spanish is merde.

  2. Mierda, caca y el dicho de cual quiere politico, es lo mismo, siempre. ?Que es la differencia entre un politico y un peurco? !Megusta jamon! Luego, vatos.

  3. He is right and he is wrong.
    All four of my grandparents immigrated to the US from what was then the Russian Empire. (Now, it’s three different countries–Belarus, Ukraine, and Moldava.) My parents and all their siblings were raised in English speaking households–so much so, that none of them can speak more than a few words of Yiddish, my grandparents’ native language. All four of my grandparents took care to learn English and speak only in English to their children.
    One set, btw, was married on July 4 (1911).

    But it’s a good article and I don’t see why anyone would call it dreck.