Top 10 Weblog Posting Usability Mistakes

Note: this article contains dead links, the url is still in the hover/alt text. Keep the web working, curate content well!

This is a great blogging guideline by the guru of usability (with some latitude for #8 — mixing topics) that all bloggers should follow (via Boing Boing). I think Hammer of Truth actually nails every one of these with the exception of #5:

5. Classic Hits are Buried
Hopefully, you’ll write some pieces with lasting value for readers outside your fan base. Don’t relegate such classics to the archives, where people can only find something if they know you posted it, say, in May 2003.

Highlight a few evergreens in your navigation system and link directly to them. For example, my own list of almost 300 Alertbox columns starts by saying, “Read these first: Usability 101 and Top Ten Mistakes of Web Design.”

Also, remember to link to your past pieces in newer postings. Don’t assume that readers have been with you from the beginning; give them background and context in case they want to read more about your ideas.

I’ve been wanting to implement a “most popular” page by day/month/year/forever, but the metrics can be a little difficult, since a post that’s been around since 2001 may have far more pageviews than one from 2004, but have no comments (and proper ranking algorithms can be a bit tedious).

And of course, this is going to be a helpful guide to help teach neophytes about blogging.

3 Comments
  1. If I were going to implement it, I would want it on a separate page and in different timespans (per the post, day/month/year/forever). Unfortunately, I have a few posts that would pre-date any plugin (How News Travels on the Internet being the most popular), so I’d have to manually factor that into whatever I wrote, perhaps by artificially inflating that pagerank retroactively.

    Regardless, it’s something I won’t be adding for some time, and especially not to the sidebar.

  2. Artificially inflating one that you know is popular seems like a decent hack.

    Either that, or make a separate “best of” or “timeless” articles page. Because there are a few gems that undoubtedly get swept by quickly when there is a 8-10 article day.