Know your Exits: Bush’s Door Gaffe

Bush presidency definedA press conference in China turned humorous Sunday when Bush was unable to escape tough questions by simply walking out of the room. After being irked by one reporter who asked if he was “off his game” and requested a follow-up, Bush responded “No you may not,” and turned to a pair of double doors stage left. Problem was, both doors were locked (video link, high quality vid).

The president, aware of the obvious humor, stood comically still for a moment in front of the gathered reporters before saying “I was trying to escape. Obviously, it didn’t work.”

Normally, this would merit a chuckle at our not-so-suave-in-chief, but the phrase “exit strategy” just seems to fly out of everyone’s mouth. Now, I’m not one to try and draw some parallel between Iraq and this event, but this just strikes me as a Gerald Ford falling down the airplane stairs moment.

Will this event become the historic caricature of the Bush presidency?

Update: I imagine the caricature version would be something similar to the humorous Saturday Night Live Funhouse skit cartoons. Audio is from some random old Bush speech about staying the course in Iraq. On screen, he tries various methods of opening the door (from putting a foot up on the other door and yanking on it violently to chopping on it with an ax to the crescendo of blowing the door up with dynamite).

And speaking of SNL, be sure to watch this weekend’s opening skit and Weekend Update.

4 Comments
  1. This is a perfect example of the unbelievable lack of tact our President displays. The Chinese were asking a legitimate, respectfully asked, question and W had to go in a little mood. “You ever heard of jetlag?” he says. How absolutely condescending!

  2. While the included photo above of ‘Bush the Bumbler’, provides for the heartiest laugh, I think a frame from a second or two later on is even more symbolically telling.

    In it, resigned to the fact that he’s been totally outwitting by a locked door, our president strikes the slumping pose of an overpriviledged little boy waiting to be rescued by someone more competent than himself, a pose he seems disturbingly familiar with.

    In other words, it captures his life story in a single frame.

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