From the “Doh” Department

The Washington Post has a headline which reads: “Roberts: Iraq Will Affect Future War Votes”. A snippet of the article provides:

The Republican chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence said yesterday that one lesson of the faulty prewar intelligence on Iraq is that senators would take a hard look at intelligence before voting to go to war.

“I think a lot of us would really stop and think a moment before we would ever vote for war or to go and take military action,” Sen. Pat Roberts (Kan.) said on “Fox News Sunday.”

Senators “don’t accept this intelligence at face value anymore,” said Pat Roberts, left, chairman of the Senate intelligence committee. Sen. Carl M. Levin said Iraq became a center of terrorism after its invasion in March 2003.

“We don’t accept this intelligence at face value anymore,” he added. “We get into preemptive oversight and do digging in regards to our hard targets.”

I’ve tried to come up with some meaningful political insight on the issue, but the most profound libertarian commentary which comes to mind is “No shit, Sherlock”.

5 Comments
  1. The Republican chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence said yesterday that one lesson of the faulty prewar intelligence on Iraq is that senators would take a hard look at intelligence before voting to go to war.

    I’ve said it before… I’ll say it again…

    Have you…. fired a politician lately!?

    What.. they are excpected to look at facts and read papers in order to determine the best course of action…

    ahhh but I just wanted the cushy people sponsored office and enjoy raping the common tax-payer with pay increases for myself and other politicians!

  2. One thing that the Washington Post article does NOT explain is that the intelligence received by Congress and the Senate had been edited by the White House first.

    You have got to remember that the CIA, FBI, Homeland Security, NSA and other civilian intelligence agencies are part of the EXECUTIVE branch of government, who all report to the White House first, and Congress second. The reports to Congress had been edited to place emphasis upon the need to go to war, so therefore could not have considered as fair and accurate reporting. To add to this, the intelligence reports were delivered to Congress one day before the vote that the vice president (remember, he IS the president of the Senate) called for.

    The executive summary of the report was 5 pages long, and the actual intelligence report hundreds of pages long. Also, Congress does not recieve direct briefings from the NSA or the daily National Security Bulletin, as most congres people do not have the requisite security clearances. In retrospect, we can now see that these bulletins and other parts of the security reports not initially given to Congress did raise serious doubts about invading Iraq.

    Nevertheless, I do agree that most of the folks in Congress who voted to authorize military action should have paid a little more attention…

  3. You have tapped implied that Democrats and Republicans alike in Congress failed in their oversight responsibility to the American people. And it is an excellent point. But, why, and how do we voters insure such irresponsible behavior by politicians does not take place again?

    This problem in American politics however, goes much deeper than the relationship between voters and the Bush Administration and Congress. The root of the problem in American politics is incumbency.

    An organization called VOIDnow, Vote Out Incumbents for Democracy, makes a sound an excellent argument that until the voters finally turn their backs on incumbents at the polls, there will be no positive changes in American politics or government.

    The Democratic and Republican incumbents in federal government have become so entrenched in partisan warfare, so consumed by campaign funding creation, and so beholding to special interests and lobbyists, that incumbents are ignoring the large majority of American voters in agreement on the need to address major issues, and playing fast and loose with their responsibilities to the voters.

    VOID’s argument, also an excellent one, says that real change cannot be found in incumbents who see no alternative to the tried and true methods of being reelected. For as they are want to argue, how can they change things if they are not in office? They have put the cart before the horse for personal career reasons, IMO.

    If voters begin to remove politicians seeking reelection from office in Washington D.C. a power shift will occur from special interests back to the majority of voters. Newly elected politicians who ran for office to solve the people’s problems will be far more free to reject special interest influences. New politicians will again be able to see the power of the voters as the key to reelection, and snub the bribes, blackmail, and pressure of special interests and incumbents who held the party’s reelection machinery in their hands.

    Voters must do exactly what special interests threaten to do; withdraw support from those seeking reelection. If VOID is successful, newly elected politicians will have a much higher regard for the voters. Their agenda will include the voter’s agenda and make their issues first priority. They will solve some of America’s biggest problems like border security, sprialing health care costs, sprialing national debt and trade deficits, falling educational performance, growing poverty, and strengthening American senior’s retirement years. And when these problems are solved, then it will be safe to vote for incumbents again: incumbents with a renewed respect for the American people and voters.

    So I respectfully submit, that Bush, Cheney, Frist, DeLay, Kennedy, Boxer, Feinstein and a host of others are symptoms of a much deeper problem, one that can only be addressed by a broad grassroots anti-incumbent voting movement that sweeps the corruption and ‘government being sold to the highest bidder’ out of Washington D.C. Disaffected Republicans and Democrats, 3rd Party and Independent voters, and millions of formerly disgusted non-voters, can all join this VOID movement at Voidnow.org. The time has come.

  4. The executive summary of the report was 5 pages long, and the actual intelligence report hundreds of pages long. Also, Congress does not recieve direct briefings from the NSA or the daily National Security Bulletin, as most congres people do not have the requisite security clearances.

    Well we could also say something similar with regards to the “no child left behind”, “Patriot” Act, “Patriot” Act 2, and other such legislation in the last 5 years….

    Congress AND the senate have shown that they do not READ the legislation they just pass it…

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