Author Archives: Darryl W. Perry

About Darryl W. Perry

Darryl has spent most of his adult life as an advocate & activist for peace and liberty. Darryl is an award winning author, publisher & radio/TV host. He is a regular contributor to several weekly and monthly newspapers. He hosts the daily newscast FPPRadioNews, the podcast Peace, Love, Liberty Radio, the weekly news podcast FPP Freedom Minute, and is a regular co-host on Free Talk Live. Darryl is a co-founder and co-chair of the NH Liberty Party. Darryl is the Owner/Managing Editor of Free Press Publications.

A pardon for Edward Snowden

snowden-pardonFor the second consecutive year, Edward Snowden appeared at South by South West in Austin, Texas, and once again, he was not able to attend in person. Snowden, again, appeared via internet stream, this time to a select group of people from the technology and policy world. The Verge reports, “Sunday Yokubaitis, president of online privacy company Golden Frog, described as a ‘call to arms’ for tech companies to foil spying with better privacy tools.” Adding that “Snowden said that as policy reform lagged, companies should adopt more secure technology that could block surveillance altogether or make it too difficult to pursue en masse. A big focus was end-to-end encryption, which would mean no one (including companies) could see the contents of communications except the sender and recipient.”

One topic not discussed was in regards to the former NSA contractor: the possibility of a fair trial. In early March, one of Snowden’s lawyers said, “[Edward] Snowden is ready to return to the [United] States, but on the condition that he is given a guarantee of a legal and impartial trial.” Jesselyn Radack, who also works on Snowden’s legal team, says a trial under the Espionage Act—the World War I-era law that Snowden is alleged to have violated—“would not be considered fair.” Radack reportedly said, “Snowden would be amenable to coming back to the United States for the kind of plea bargain that Gen. [David] Petraeus received.”

Patreus plead guilty to a misdemeanor charge of mishandling classified material and will serve no jail time for his actions. Unlike Snowden, who gave classified documents about mass surveillance to members of the media; Petraeus gave classified info to his biographer and girlfriend, Paula Broadwell. Patreus then lied to the FBI about having given Broadwell access to the documents.

By contrast, Edward Snowden never lied about his actions, and even explained why he did it. We don’t yet know if Edward Snowden will ever be allowed to return to the United States, or if he will ever appear in a court. However, he should not have to appear in court, because he should be granted a full pardon.

I know that will not happen as long as Barack Obama is in the White House, because it was Obama’s Administration that sought espionage charges in the first place. Nor do I expect a Republican Presidentt to issue such a pardon either. Even the supposed libertarian Rand Paul has said that Snowden should spend “a few years in prison.”

It is clear that neither major party will do what is right, and will only serve to protect their own interests. Is it any wonder that both parties now have an approval rating below 40%?

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Survey: Americans say big government isn’t necessary?

gov is probA new survey from Gallup proclaims “Americans Name Government as No. 1 U.S. Problem.” This headline alone brought a smile to my face, until I clicked on the article and read the results, and began to think about what the results meant.

Many conservatives like to quote Ronald Reagan who, during his first inaugural address, said, “government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem.”

These are the same people who then look for government solutions to what they perceive as problems: immigration, drugs, same-sex marriage, terrorism, and a myriad of other issues whereby they want government to find a solution.

On the flip-side, you have many liberals/progressives who think that government is not doing enough to solve a myriad of what they perceive as problems: campaign financing, unfair taxation, guns, drugs, terrorism, and a myriad of other issues whereby they want government to find a solution.

So, right off the bat you have two seemingly opposing sides who want government to find solutions to their perceived problems.

And both sides – which are really different feathers on the same bird – agreeing on some of the problems.

The difference between them is they disagree on the solutions, which may explain why only 31% of respondents stated they were “satisfied with the way things are going in the United States at this time,” whereas 67% were dissatisfied.

But what about the survey title? Good question. see more…

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The “S” word: reclaiming personal liberty

Secession-of-American-States-e1341742728488During the 2015 NH Liberty Forum, the NH Liberty Party held its third annual convention.

The NH Liberty Party is an avowed pro-secessionist party with a 5 plank platform that can not be changed “except by 100% of voting members at the annual convention.” Of course, secession is only 1 plank in the platform, with the party also taking a staunch libertarian position on Self-determination, Non-aggression, Crime, and Voluntary Interaction.

The reason for these libertarian planks, according to Ian Freeman, party co-founder and co-chair, is to exclude the bigots and xenophobes who may wish to seceded to then implement their bigotry.

Many people who advocate for secession will not use the word, seeing it as a third rail, of sorts. see more…

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Regulate everything like tomatoes: a guide to ending the drug war

Regulate everything like tomatoesIn late February, the Colorado Department of Revenue Marijuana Enforcement Division released a reports stating, “On December 31, 2014, Colorado concluded a full twelve months of lawful retail marijuana sales to adults over 21 years of age. The State experienced many firsts, such as the implementation of the first-in-the-world comprehensive regulatory model overseeing cultivation, products manufacturing, and sale of marijuana for non-medical retail use.” see more…

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GOP digs in heels on DHS and immigration funding

GOP amnestyMany Republican lawmakers are digging in their heels in the fight to defund implementation of what they see as an executive overreach by President Obama. They’re so entrenched in their position that they’re acting as though they’ll allow the Department of Homeland Security budget to not be adopted. Which in reality wouldn’t have much impact on DHS activities, as approximately 200,000 of the 230,000 DHS employees are considered essential. The Chicago Tribune reports, “Most training, hiring, research and purchasing would be suspended. Border security, disaster relief and cybersecurity programs would continue uninterrupted.” In other words, nothing will really change, except that “essential” DHS employees will work without a paycheck until a budget is adopted. see more…

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Costly FAA drone regulations exclude media usage

2015-02-15-103736_1366x768_scrotAfter nearly four years of delay, the FAA is poised to release regulations for the commercial use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS/drone). A document, that could be a draft of the proposed regulations, was spotted on a federal website on Friday by a drone user and downloaded before being removed from the website, according to the Wall Street Journalhost. Forbes reports, “The document is dated February 2015 and is captioned ‘Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Regulatory Evaluation, Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems’ authored by George Thurston of the Office of Aviation Policy and Plans, Economic Analysis Division. But, it’s possible this is a leaked early draft that has since been revised or is otherwise incomplete or inaccurate.” see more…

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No direct link between cannabis use and traffic accidents

Reading on freeway signs with small fonts: unsafe as fuckLast Summer, data came out of Colorado reporting that traffic fatalities were near-historic lows. Now, new studies by the NHTSA (National Highway Transportation Safety Administration) have scientifically proven what some have already known: there doesn’t seem to be a link between cannabis use and car accidents.

The Drug and Alcohol Crash Risk Study which looked at 9,000 participants over a 20 month period found that “about 8 percent of drivers during weekend nighttime hours were found to have alcohol in their system, and just over 1 percent were found with 0.08 percent or higher breath alcohol content – the legal limit in every state. This is down by about 30 percent from the previous survey in 2007 and down 80 percent from the first survey in 1973.”

The study confirmed that alcohol use by drivers was clearly associated with elevated risk of crash involvement. A driver with a breath alcohol content (BrAC) above 0.08 was 4 times as likely to have an accident compared to a driver with a lower or no BrAC, and “[d]rivers with alcohol levels at .15 BrAC had 12 times the risk.” see more…

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Not everyone is “lovin” the newest McDonald’s ad campaign

For many years, McDonald’s has used the slogan “I’m lovin’ it.” Now they’re running an ad campaign titled “Choose Lovin” in which they will randomly select customers to “pay with lovin.” The idea is supposed to be a light-hearted gimmick to get people to do something that spreads joy or love, this could be as simple as dancing, calling a family member, or saying something a person loves about himself. see more…

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Lessons learned from the Barrett Brown case

The prosecution of Barrett Brown, which seemed to go under the radar of the mainstream media, is one of the most important cases of my lifetime, and has taught us several important things.

There is no Freedom of the Press:
Barrett Brown is an investigative journalist and had been a contributor to Vanity Fair and The Guardian. He also founded Project PM, a project to crowdsource review of documents for investigative journalism.

EFF reports, “Brown’s legal trouble began in 2011, when hackers obtained a voluminous set of emails from government contractor HBGary and placed them on the Internet. He turned to crowdsourcing to review records and emails taken from another government contractor, Stratfor, after hackers broke into their servers later in 2011. Those records included millions of emails discussing opportunities for rendition and assassination, and detailing attempts to subvert journalists, political groups and even foreign leaders. They also included tens of thousands of credit card numbers and their verification codes.” see more…

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Holder prohibits most state and local use of DOJ’s asset forfeiture program

Eric Holder made headlines this week when he announced a new policy prohibiting state and local governments from using federal civil asset forfeiture laws for most cases.

The Washington Post reported, “Holder’s action represents the most sweeping check on police power to confiscate personal property since the seizures began three decades ago as part of the war on drugs.”

The DOJ’s Equitable Sharing program has allowed thousands of local and state police agencies to have seized nearly $3 billion in cash and property since 2008.

Using Equitable Sharing, a state or local police department or drug task force would seize property and then have that property adopted by a federal agency.

The agency making the seizure would then be allowed to keep up to 80 percent of the value of the items confiscated. see more…

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The Congressional “good standard” bar should be raised

bar-too-lowNot many elected officials explain to their constituents the reasons they vote a certain way on a given bill. Even fewer are those who will explain their vote on every bill! Justin Amash seems to be doing just that, posting on his facebook profile an explanation for his votes.

Most recently, he explained his reasons for voting “present” on a bill to authorize construction of the Keystone XL Pipeline: “I voted present on H R 3, Northern Route Approval Act. The Keystone XL pipeline is a private project owned by TransCanada Corporation. This bill improperly exempts TransCanada Corporation—and no other company—from laws that require pipeline owners and operators to obtain certain government permits and approvals.
I support construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, and holding it up for over four years (with no end in sight) for political reasons is wrong. see more…

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The economics of xenophobia

GDP increaseI recently read a pair of articles that on the surface are only tangentially connected. However after a little deep thought, I realized the authors are looking at the same problem from both a micro and macro level. The articles were “‘Buy Local’ is really bad economics” and “The economic case for open borders.” Again, after some thought I came up with the hypothesis: people who are xenophobic have a flawed understanding of economics. see more…

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2014: The year police abuse went mainstream

POlice-abuse-too-many-cops-too-little-justiceIt’s time again to look at a year gone by, though unlike years past where I attempt to summarize the year, I will instead look at what I consider to be the story of the year. It’s not easy picking a top story for the entire year, in fact the top story of 2014 isn’t just 1 story, it’s an entire genre of news stories: Police Abuse. see more…

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A big year for cannabis

marihuanaThere have been major stories regarding cannabis over the last 15 months. On August 29, 2013, the Department of Justice announced, “Based on assurances that those states [that have legalized cannabis] will impose an appropriately strict regulatory system, the Department has informed the governors of both states that it is deferring its right to challenge their legalization laws at this time.” Further, Deputy Attorney General James M. Cole sent a memo to all United States Attorneys explaining the DOJ’s stance. see more…

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The only way to stop CIA torture is to abolish the CIA

endtorture3Earlier this week, the US Senate released a heavily redacted 540 page summary of a larger 6,000 page report on the CIA’s use of torture. The report, called a “footnote in history” by Senator Richard Burr (NC), detailed some of the torture techniques used in the secret CIA prisons. In addition to simulated drowning, also called waterboarding, some of the captives “were deprived of sleep for up to 180 hours, at times with their hands shackled above their heads,” at least four of them with medical complications in their lower extremities. Reuters reports, the report recorded cases of “sexual abuse, including ‘rectal feeding’ or ‘rectal hydration’ without any documented medical need.” The summary from the Senate states, “The CIA led several detainees to believe they would never be allowed to leave CIA custody alive,suggesting to one detainee that he would only leave in a coffin-shaped box.” see more…

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It doesn’t really matter if Congress declares war against TIS

Senate Swearing InLast week, Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) introduced a declaration of war against The Islamic State. US News reports, “Paul’s legislation would repeal the 2002 Iraq War authorization, an action the Obama administration supports, and would set a one-year timer on the 2001 anti-al-Qaida authorization, which the administration currently cites as allowing the war against the Islamic State group.” see more…

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FBI crime report lacks some useful data

holderEvery year the FBI releases what it calls the Uniform Crime Report, which details numbers of arrests – which counts one arrest for each separate instance in which a person is arrested, cited, or summoned for an offense – and various other data on crime, criminals, and law enforcement officers.

One of the numbers that jumped out to me was that arrests for cannabis possession makes up a smaller percentage of drug related arrests out west (18%) compared to the rest of the country (~50%). see more…

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Against discrimination at the barrel of a gun

no gun in roomThe Advocates for Self Government have produced a 10 question survey designed to challenge “the dominant ‘Left versus Right’ political model” which tries to categorize “virtually all political opinion into either left and right. This model — still widely used today — is misleading and fatally flawed.”

However, this quiz still allows people to be classified as supporters of liberty, who still believe in using government force. A better, shorter quiz asks the one question: Should any good or service be provided at the barrel of a gun? This allows all people to be placed into one of two categories: people who believe in freedom, and those who don’t.

This single question can be applied to every situation: immigration, education, welfare, marriage and even discrimination. In each case, the support of liberty would say, “no good or service should be provided at the barrel of a gun.” see more…

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Hoax video urges real debate

hoax video real debateIn the 1997 hit movie, Wag the Dog, a filmmaker is hired to create a fake war in Albania to distract the public from a Presidential sex scandal in the days leading up to the election, and it was never discovered that the “war” wasn’t real. In a real life twist that seems to in some ways mirror the film, Antiwar.com reports Norwegian director Lars Klevberg created a 1 minute video purporting to shows a young Syrian boy “weave his way down a dusty street, dodging bullets to reach a terrified girl cowering behind a car. The boy even plays dead at one point to deceive the sharpshooters, who miss hitting both children as they appear to safely run off.” see more…

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Does civil disobedience work?

arnold-abbottDoes civil disobedience work? There isn’t a clear “yes” or “no” answer to this question, rather the correct answer is “sometimes.” There is no denying that Martin Luther King, Jr. had a great deal of success with civil disobedience, the same can be said of Gandhi. However, there are people who will discount any act of civil disobedience, regardless of the issue or the goal. see more…

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Should people rethink the concept of time?

It’s again that time of year when the clocks change, and many people are (rightly or wrongly) complaining about the system of Daylight Saving Time. While I find the concept annoying, and believe it to be a system that should be abolished, I’d like to discuss the concept of time and the importance of punctuality.

The structuring of time into hours and minutes is a relatively old concept with the earliest sundials dating back to around 3500BC, however there are people who regard time as an abstract, and are always late. This in turn creates a conflict with the people who are punctual. see more…

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Does Hillary Clinton understand economics?

hillaryLast week, Hillary Clinton made a stop in Boston to campaign for Massachusetts gubernatorial candidate Martha Coakley. During her 25 minute speech, Clinton said, “Don’t let anybody tell you it’s corporations and businesses that create jobs. You know that old theory, trickle-down economics. That has been tried, that has failed. It has failed rather spectacularly.” She then made a statement that her husband “brought arithmetic” to Washington. see more…

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FBI on encryption: nothing to hide, nothing to fear?

9074740413_bd2d118133_c-thumb-570x378-125862Ever since the revelations from Edward Snowden became public last year, there has been an increased interest in encryption and online privacy. This has led companies like Apple and Google to encrypt or protect their new operating systems with coding by default. The FBI isn’t happy with the news. see more…

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