Tag Archives: Megaupload

Kim Dotcom’s new strategy: singing

I don’t know whether to laugh or cry at Kim Dotcom’s latest musical public appeal in the ongoing extradition and copyright case against MegaUpload, but props for giving the C-G-Am-F chords a very polished run through in this video aimed at Occupiers, Anonymous and Barack Obama himself.

Fun sidenote: If you’re the president and you’ve somehow managed to alienate New Zealand officials enough that they won’t visit, you’re doing a terrible job.

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Kim Dotcom lays out ten “facts” about his case

From his twitter account, Kim Dotcom continues trying his legal battle in the court of public opinion by explaining the shams foisted upon him by the U.S. DOJ and their puppets in New Zealand:

Fact #1: All my assets are still frozen. I have no funds to pay lawyers & defend myself in the biggest copyright case in world history.

Fact #2: NZ courts ruled: Restraining order illegal. Search warrants illegal. But I still have no access to my files. Not even copies.

Fact #3: NZ court ruled: FBI removed my data from NZ illegally. But the FBI reviewed my hard drives anyway and didn’t send them back.

Fact #4: The DOJ argues in US court that I should not get a penny unfrozen for my defense cause I should be treated like a bank robber.

Fact #5: The DOJ argues in US court that I should not have the lawyers of my choosing because of a conflict of interest with rights holders.

Fact #6: There is no criminal statute for secondary copyright infringement in the US. The DOJ doesn’t care. Let’s just be creative.

Fact #7: Only 10% of our users and 15% of our revenue came from US users. Yet the DOJ argues in US court that all assets are tainted.

Fact #8: The DOJ told the Grand Jury that Megaupload employs 30 staff. In reality 220 jobs were lost because of the US actions.

Fact #9: The DOJ shut down several companies for alleged copyright infringement including N1 Limited – A fashion label making clothing.

Fact #10: The DOJ is charging us with Money Laundering and Racketeering cause Copyright Infringement isn’t enough for Extradition from NZ.

While it is very easily arguable that Megaupload and Megavideo were being used for copyright infringement at some level — something he’s acknowledged and had a response system in place to remove said infringing content — the DOJ’s response to the daily onslaught of Google/YouTube infringement claims in an entirely different manner can only explained as quid pro quo.

The unfortunate lesson: if you want to run a large internet company unmolested by Uncle Sam, you had better grease the right palms in DC.

UPDATE: According to a report last month from Stuff.co.nz, Dotcom is being denied access to evidence (except 40 pages of the prosecution’s “cherry-picked” items from over 22 million emails) as he fights the ongoing and financially exhaustive extradition battle, he has threatened to publish what little information has been released by the DOJ to his legal team to the public in a bid to win sympathy.

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U.S. failing to re-imprison or silence Kim Dotcom

On January 20th, Kim Dotcom (a.k.a. Kim Schmitz), the New Zealand Megaupload founder and internet superstar was bum-rushed by an two-year FBI investigation that culminated in an early-morning paramilitary raid and seizure on everything Dotcom owned and then some. In fact the “and then some” should have you worried, if you’re an online entrepreneur.

U.S. authorities managed to convince the New Zealand anti-terrorist squad that operating a file hosting website (or piracy enabler as the opposition would so crassly frame it) warranted “… armed officers arrived in helicopters and dropped into the Dotcom mansion courtyard.” Police turned off and seized servers, sending legitimate paying customers in a frenzy. Anyone who critically relied upon the Megaupload company has been up shit’s creek without a paddle since.

Now it seems Kim Dotcom is starting to get the upper hand in his defense and public relations nightmare — which will no doubt be lengthy and costly to pursue for both sides. He’s gained access to $74,000 to pay creditors, and is asking for an additional $220,000 to cover additional household, legal and business related expenses. I assume his success is trying to be used as an easy target of ridicule, but we can’t simply swallow the prosecution’s assertion that he’s some kind of thief who will disappear in the night because he’s successful. see more…

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